Archive for JulieWinkleGiulioni SmartBlogs

Trust is nearly synonymous with leadership. And it’s big business. We buy books (from the selection of more than 80,000 about trust on Amazon. We attend seminars. And we work diligently to cultivate it with employees, peers, supervisors, customers — heck, everyone we know. But field research suggests that real and lasting trust may depend less on what we do and more on what we don’t do.[…] Continue Reading »

Recognition may be among today’s most heavily researched leadership and supervision topics. And the results are consistently disturbing:

  • According to studies by Badgeville research, 79% of those who quit their jobs cite lack of appreciation as the main reason.
  • Wichita State University research reported that 81% of employees seldom or never received public praise, 76% seldom or never received written thanks from their managers, and 58% rarely or never received praise from their manager.
  • […] Continue Reading »

This post is part of the series “Communication,” a weeklong effort co-hosted by SmartBrief’s SmartBlog on Leadership and the folks at Switch & ShiftKeep track of the series here and check out our daily e-mail newsletter, SmartBrief on Leadership. Don’t subscribe? Sign up.

The changing nature of communication is a popular topic in professional journals and water-cooler conversations.[…] Continue Reading »

Employee engagement was one of the most discussed and written-about leadership topics of 2013. And it will likely continue to be in the year to come — with good cause. Engagement has been positively correlated with employee retention, customer service/satisfaction, productivity, and profitability.

But, have you ever wondered about all of the information that exists on the subject?[…] Continue Reading »

In the 1980s, MBWA was the rage. It involved the radical notion that leaders could drive better results by stepping out of their offices and engaging with employees and the work flow in a less formal, more impromptu fashion. “Management by walking around” changed the cadence of business — in large part through greater leadership involvement and presence.[…] Continue Reading »