How many times have you heard or even said, “Is that market attractive to us”? We look at the markets we’re in, the markets our competitors are in, maybe even some that are new and wonder if they are/could be good for our business. We may even think of creating or segmenting in a new way.

Stop and think of the hubris in that very question: “Is that market attractive to us?”

What is the real subject of that question? Us! Not the market! This is not as subtle as it seems. Subtleties reveal our organization’s basic assumptions and beliefs — our culture. Words — what, how, when, in which order we use them – mirror our culture. When I hear this question, which I do all the time in my line of work, I don’t hear a marketing question, I see a red flag. I see an organization that is internally focused, not outwardly focused on the customer.…

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Children making music with instruments at homeThe math teachers at my school — Castle Park Middle in Chula Vista, Calif. — face the same challenges moving students to math excellence and mastery as so many teachers across the nation. Students must learn a difficult common core curriculum, catch up on missing skills from previous grades, as well as complete numerous rigorous practice problems. Students are often not engaged in this process due to variety of factors including poverty, different learning styles and English language issues. Some of our at-risk students find it easier to give up rather than face a daunting, difficult path to math proficiency.

As part of the Granger Turnaround Model, my team and I addressed attendance and behavioral issues, identified struggling students and arranged for time-on-task both in school and after school for academic supports. The missing piece was a set of math lessons that was rigorous enough to move students toward proficiency, yet engaging enough to keep our at-risk students excited, motivated and focused on mastering math.…

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Since the FTC updated their social media guidelines last year, a lot of social marketers have a lot of questions about staying legal. The bottom line: It all comes down to proper disclosure.

In his presentation at SocialMedia.org‘s BlogWell conference, Andy Sernovitz explains why paying for social media coverage makes a sticky situation that requires the right kind of disclosure. But he also shares why doing disclosure right is easy.

Here are three ways you can make a habit of staying ethical in social media:

  • Use these 10 magic words: “I work for (company) and this is my personal opinion.” When you’re open and honest about who you are, it not only keeps you out of legal trouble, but can also help your credibility.
  • Make it clear and conspicuous: The FTC doesn’t give social media marketers a script to follow. Instead, they require marketers to just be upfront about disclosure in a way that’s easy to understand and easy to see.
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It’s mythical and alluring, that thing that you may secretly desire. It surfaces slowly and silently unseen, unheard and often unrecognized. It hides within the facade of your ego, growing larger with time while blinding you to its presence.

Make no mistake. It will destroy you and your organization even while it parasitizes your values and harms the spirits of those who once willingly followed you, but who now trudge along like sheep going to slaughter.

“Why aren’t our employees more innovative?” you exclaim, and the question “Why must I carry the burden of being all things to all people?” is keeping you up at night.

You’re blind to it when it surfaces, this thing named control. Yet it makes you feel powerful. The desire to control will surface throughout your leadership career. The trick to keeping control at bay is be aware when it surfaces and to let go of it (this is the hard part) when it’s appropriate.…

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It’s one thing to have a corporate food safety program but entirely another to make sure the executive suite is aware of its importance and the rest of the company buys into a food safety culture, experts said at the 2014 Food Safety Summit.

Food safety programs must be well-funded, integrated in all systems and departments, and receive support starting at the CEO level.

For food safety directors, it begins by having an elevator pitch ready at all times to grab the attention of higher-ups.

For Jorge Hernandez, senior VP for Food Safety & Quality Assurance at US Foods, the line is “I’m the one who is keeping you out of jail,” which he used when he met his new CEO for the first time. It got him a meeting with the chief exec a week later, during which he was able to explain everything the company was doing to ensure safety and protect the company from legal liability.…

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